ROME, PHILADELPHIANS, AND THE ARCHITECTURAL REVIVAL OF THE POSTWAR AMERICAN ACADEMY

Posted October 28th, 2009 at 12:15 pm.

The Society of Architectural Historians Philadelphia Chapter
ROME, PHILADELPHIANS, AND THE ARCHITECTURAL REVIVAL
OF THE POSTWAR AMERICAN ACADEMY
by Denise Costanzo, Visiting Assistant Professor, Pennsylvania State University
Tuesday, November 3 at 6:00 p.m.
The Architectural Archives/Univ. of Penn., 220 South 34th Street
Reservations required, limited to 30 participants.
Contact Bill Whitaker at wwhitake@design.upenn.edu, or phone 215-898-8323.
Free for Phila SAH members, $5.00 for non members, checks payable to Philadelphia Chapter SAH.

Following the Second World War, the American Academy in Rome struggled to regain its relevance to the US’s rapidly changing cultural environment. After a half-century as a stalwart bastion of Beaux-Arts classicism, one central strategy was to align itself with modern architecture, fast becoming the discipline’s new mainstream. From 1946-1956, four Philadelphians–Laurance Roberts, George Howe, Louis Kahn, and Robert Venturi–would play instrumental roles in redefining Rome’s architectural significance, and re-establish the Academy’s importance for American architects in the years to come.

Filed under: Uncategorized by Margaret Kelly

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